Back to forum
image
rss 136 weeks ago
I've always wondered something about designs that are submitted here. Today's design on the 7th September 2011 for example (many others as well), shows some really nice and intricate detail. My question is whether this is in vector or some large raster format? Obviously vector-based designs are best for scalability, but in this instance I can't tell whether the design is vector or raster. If it is indeed in vector, how was it done?

Sketching comes first obviously, but when I do designs, they are scanned in for manual vectorization by myself. The results are always smooth and perfect, just to my liking. But when it comes to rough treatments, as in this case, I'm a bit at a loss. I'm not referring to noise and grain, those are easy to replicate in Illustrator, but instead the rough uneven edges of designs. Do folks scan their art in, auto-vectorize in Illustrator and call it a day? Or do sketches undergo further treatment... like black-inking first before scans?
7Comments
  • image
    136 weeks ago
    I think everyone works differently. I scan and tweak in any format that will get the look I'm trying to achieve, but design and illustration is a hobby for me. I'd be curious to hear others processes.
  • image
    136 weeks ago
    I don't have much experience in design but what I do is I scan the piece and then re draw it in Photoshop. I rarely use illustrator, mostly because I've been using PS for 5+ years and I understand the majority of the functions. Certain things require illustrator, of course but Photoshop is my fave. You will notice that my designs do not have perfectly even lines. I'm not sure if this is exactly what you are asking about and I'm sorry if this doesn't relate at all to what you are trying to say!
  • image
    136 weeks ago
    I draw pieces of the art myself with ink. I scan it in and re-draw it in illustrator. Then I create all extra bits and pieces including fonts in Illustrator as well. If called for I hand draw my fonts and re-create them in illustrator. If I'm using photo-real images then I use Photoshop. Also if the art is more than 6 colors it would be faster to use photoshop. If I need to airbrush I use photoshop. I never create any fonts in photoshop. So when I'm creating an image in photoshop and need a font I create it in illustrator, copy, paste it in photoshop and then rasterize it.

    I'll explain more if you don't follow...
  • image
    136 weeks ago
    Depending on the design, I sketch it on paper and then scan it in to either Photoshop or Illustrator. If it's a bit grungy or sketchy-looking I use photoshop, if it's clean I use Illustrator. Then I make the design from my basic sketch. I tend to start in Illustrator and get done what I like in that software, and then I open it in Photoshop for the finishing touches. I always tend to prefer having a mostly completed design in Illustrator as a vector, just in case. Though while Photoshop is mostly raster, things like text are actually vector, which is very nice.
  • image
    136 weeks ago
    UncleBoB said:
    My question is whether this is in vector or some large raster format?


    I expect most would be in Vector, some are in Raster and a few are layers of both. Learn to use Vectors as soon as possible, unless you find them a massive obstacle to creating Art in which case go for large scale Raster.

    For Raster images size want to be about 4000 pixels wide by upto to about 5000 pixel high at 300 DPI. Or if you are working in Vectors 14" wide by 17" high. This is right for Teefury work, others may use different screen sizes for the silk screen printing process OR the printable area on their Direct to Garment printers may be different.

    If you must work in Raster, get into the habit of working in layers right away and keep a clean backrgound layer at the bottom that you can hide; this is so you can save an image of just your design. And with all methods keep multiple saves as you progress and revise your work.

    UncleBoB said:
    vector, how was it done?


    There are a number of methods. Any automatic method is best avoided as they can result in a not very good photocopy of the original.
    *Tracing by hand a scanned image
    *Tracing by hand a photo or other image
    *Creating from scratch
    *Creating from an image or model made in another package (eg. 3d modelling software)
    There are probably other methods, all of the above are the ones I've used (except auto).

    UncleBoB said:
    when it comes to rough treatments, as in this case, I'm a bit at a loss.


    To create rough effects, usually distress effects in my case, I create a raster copy of the vector image at very HiRes and then cut holes in it. I magic wand select from a layer I created in a noise texture generator and then use it to delete from the HiRes Raster copy of my image.

    For Halftones it's best just to leave the gradient in and let the printers deal with the Halftoning, unless you want a specific look. I used to create Halftones from the gradients on a separate layer, but I stopped doing it because my package can only create Raster Halftones.

    For more program specific info you'd need advice from someone who uses Illustrator, I don't currently use it.

  • image
    135 weeks ago
    Thanks guys, I really really appreciate the answers! So basically, for that level of detail combined with rough outlines, you guys would prefer to work with Photoshop. Makes sense I guess, it's faster and more intuitive, I suppose it's comforting in a way... I'm not missing out on some common trick everyone uses lol.

    But honestly it would be awesome if they were in vector. Okay I'm going to test this out, if I uncover some fast trick, I'll let you guys know. Thanks again!
  • image
    135 weeks ago
    I'm a vector man myself. I've be using corel draw for 10+ years now. I work a lot in photoshop as well, and started to experiment in illustrator for it's brush strokes. I use all of them on a daily basis but corel is my go-to program. Most people don't give corel draw a chance, but it's a great program. With a tutorial, one can get proficient pretty quick.


Back to Top