Hi everyone !

I read all topics on this forum about copyright. Also, I read lots of articles on internet but i did not understand.
I want to design shirt like this;
I take my sketch's photo here :

http://i819.photobucket.com/albums/zz114/gonenlisalih/DSCN0752.jpg

Now i want to ink that sketch on PS. After this, I also add inked drawing of Davy Jones' Ship on background (i will draw ship)
There is no parody. Just this.
Is this a copyright infringement ?

Also, i have an idea for my next design. I will draw all creatures, robots and other awesome things from Doctor Who's episodes and i want to make a collage with these drawings. Is this a copyright infringement ?

Thanks for now !
6Comments
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    100 weeks ago
    Yes, that would be copyright infringement because you are taking someone elses work and not really changing anything to warrant calling it a parody.

    In all honestly, many of the doctor who shirts are probably copyright infringement. I think they factor in a few things when deciding what to print. Since there have been so many doctor who shirts, it seems no one has come after them to stop so the doctor who shirt would probably be fine.

    I have heard disney is pretty protective over its properties so a pirates shirt would probably be not worth the risk to them.
  • image
    100 weeks ago
    Thanks a lot heyboova ! Now, i really understood the copyright infringement.
  • image
    99 weeks ago
    If you are still interested, I would google Jeff Koons vs Art Rogers. It is an interesting court case about how Koons took a photograph and simply turned it into a statue. The court decided that he didn't change anything about it so it could not be viewed as a parody or fall under fair use.
  • image
    99 weeks ago
    The art would be to make it recognizable as a parody, but with your own original work.
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    99 weeks ago
    @heyboova ok. i will read them. thanks !

    thanks for explanations.
  • image
    96 weeks ago
    You should keep in mind, too, that when you submit your designs to a site like TeeFury, there's usually a clause in their Artists' Agreement or Terms of Service that states that by submitting a design, you're claiming that you indeed have the right to sell it or give it to someone else to sell. Which means you're saying, "Yep, this is 100% my work, and if it's not, the person who owns the copyright has agreed - implicitly or explicitly - that I may use it for profit, or the use is allowed under the law." So should a copyright holder decide that a design does indeed violate their rights, the website can tell them, "Well, this artist told us they had the right to sell this design, and we took their word for it." I'm not a lawyer, but I'd guess this protects them a bit, and kind of puts the ultimate responsibility on the artist to defend why they believe their work is not in fact an infringement. (Not that I think TeeFury or these other sites is trying to throw their artists under the bus if problems arise, but everybody's gotta do a little CYA nowadays.) There's a great video of a lecture at ComicCon this year by a lawyer at DeviantArt who talks about issues of copyright in relationship to fan art that's worth a peak: Fan Art Law at Comic-Con 2012


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