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rss 147 weeks ago
Hi all! I was wondering if anyone could help me out and let me know if there is a minimum line width for teefury designs. I am currently working on a piece with some small detail elements in Illustrator and wanted to make sure it would be printable. Thanks!!
3Comments
  • image
    147 weeks ago
    Bump. There was a discussion where jimiyo confirmed some settingas for Halftone shading which indicated a Lines Per Inch resolution of 45-65.

    Here's an article which describes the difference between DPI and LPI.

    When you alter the settings in GIMP using the Newsprint filter, the dialog box gives an interesting display...

    filters-distort-newsprint.png

    SPI is Sample Per Inch (the resolution of your sample image). When you adjust the Cell Size to make the dots smaller, the Output LPI increases. I try to keep the LPI between 45 and 65. For working at around 300dpi, dots with a Cell Size of 5 are at the high end of this, and 6 are at the low end. Illustrator should have a similar way of judging LPI.

    Proper halftoning does not need antialiasing: the aim is to reduce the color depth after all... but since the GIMP effect can be used for on-screen special effects, the option is there to smooth the circles. It's useful to apply a little anti-aliasing to simulate ink smearing on paper for an on-screen piece of art... but because this is for someone printing the resulting image, set the antialising to 1 (ie, off) and the ink will 'anti-alias' itself.

    I hope the TeeFury staff give an actual answer involving numbers!
  • image
    147 weeks ago
    Just noticed: the size of the output LPI, multiplied by the cell size, gives your resolution of your image. Flip around that equation... for the 45 to 65 range:

    At 72dpi on screen, you could have very small cells. However, if your art is 72dpi and only six colors, it's going to look jagged.

    At 200dpi, a Cell Size of 4 gives 50 LPI. Nicely within the range.

    At 300dpi, a Cell Size of 4 is 75 DPI (very fine print, too fine for the shirts). '5' gives 60 LPI and '6' gives 50 LPI (both within range). So for shading at 300dpi, use 6 (or 5 at a stretch).

    6zaru1.png

    Anything bigger will look like dots instead of shading, but that could be part of your idea all along (see shading in jimiyo's text from a recent shirt of the day)...

    1306490337_BOTTOM__052702h58m09.jpg

    DON'T FORGET - the printing process will blur very finely spaced elements together. The ink will spread and touch close-by ink, potentially closing fine gaps. I've made designs that people have said are 'too busy', and they were right. Any design used will be printed on cotton, a medium that looks like Shredded Wheat under a microscope.

    Everyday-Objects-Under-the-Microscope_Thread-and-Needle.jpg

    Be precise. Just don't be TOO precise!
  • image
    147 weeks ago
    Exactly! I like being precise but hopefully I'm not too precise. When drawing machines and technology type things I tend to like to include every little screw and cable. So I just one to make sure my stroke width isn't too fine. But I can always simplify if need be! Thanks!


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